/Interactive Notebooks
7 08, 2017

How to Customize Your Interactive Notebooks…A Video Tutorial

By | August 7th, 2017|Interactive Notebooks|0 Comments

 

Get free interactive notebook templates

Hi everyone! I recently created this video tutorial that teaches you how to customize your interactive notebooks. In this tutorial, I teach how to create an acronym book that can be used for back to school or as part of an all about me unit, but you can use these techniques to create whatever your heart desires. Creating these yourself for a lesson can be complete in minutes, and there is no breaking the bank doing this because you can use these throughout the entire school year!

I hope you find this tutorial helpful! Make sure to read below afterwards to snatch up the free template.

Let me know if you have any questions in the comments or any other types of tutorials you would like to see me create! I am here to help! If you are wondering where to get those templates, you can find them by clicking here.

Sign up for email to snag up the free template. If you are already a subscriber, just fill it out to get it sent to your email. I promise I am not into spamming. My current history show that I don’t even send out a single email some months! Life is too busy for all that spamming, haha!

Thanks for stopping by the Candy Class!

Sharing Teaching Ideas for K-2

22 07, 2015

The Interactive Notebook Template Types

By | July 22nd, 2015|Interactive Notebooks, Interview with a Notebook Template|6 Comments

Hi everyone! Today, I am sharing the template types and some inspiring ideas.

The first template type is the accordion. The accordion is a template that folds up like an accordion. It’s unique shape can be used for lots of purposes including connecting ideas and things that go in chronological order. Find out more ideas with the Interview with an Accordion post here.

 

The second template type is the Book Fold. It folds over, and you can flip the tabs up. It works great for self-quizzing. Questions can be placed on top, and answers can be placed under the tab.

 

The third template type is the Compressed Shape. They have an origami feel to them, but it is pretty simple to use. Students can compress it, and then they can reopen it. I invented the one using hearts that expands into a flower from my inspiration from the commonly used one that folds into a triangle. As far as the ideal activity goes, these are great for writing activities (and you could even skip the notebook and have students make things like Mother’s Day cards with them). You got four hearts with room to write.

 

The fourth template type is the double door. Now, there are actually two types of double doors. This one is the more basic double door. It folds in like shutter doors and has room on the inside to store some information. 

 

The other double door type is called the center-cut double door. It opens up like double doors, but students will have to write directly on the notebook page under it or have another sheet of paper placed under it.
The fifth template type is the Flip Flap Book. The flip flap book is probably the most commonly used template type. It is very versatile for a lot of activities, and it is very easy to put together. Just like the book fold, you can store answers under it for some self-quizzing. It works great, but just like worksheets can get boring, it is a good idea to flavor up interactive notebook templates with other types of templates too.

 

The sixth template type are the Maps. These are graphic organizers that have been made into something that can flip and flap or they can just be added to interactive notebooks as your everyday bubble map.

 

The seventh template type is the Match Book. This book folds up like the name suggests, a match book. Really, if you think about it, it almost functions like a book fold and flip flap book. However, it has an extra flap that folds over the top. That extra spot can be great for a main idea or topic. It can also work great for simply getting away from the status quo of a flip flap book. 😉

 

 

The eighth template type is the Mini-Book. The mini-book is a mini-book. What is nice about the mini-books is it maximizes the space on that interactive notebook page. For example, you can have a six page mini-book fit on half of a notebook page. Think about all the information that can be stored there!

 

The ninth template type is the Petal Book. A petal book is a fun template! Often, it will look like a flower. The “petals” will flip and flap. You can have a central idea or concept in the middle of the petal book and each petal can hold information that build on that concept. When you think about it, these also function great as a graphic organizer to help students grasp concepts better.

 

 

The tenth template type is the Pocket or aka Envelope. These templates are handy for storing parts to an interactive notebook or being used as part of a sorting activity.

You don’t always have to store square or rectangle pieces in these either. Puzzle pieces and other fun shapes can be stored in a pocket.

The eleventh template type is the Shape Flap. Shape flaps almost function like a flip flap book, only they don’t have multiple tabs. I came up with the idea for this template type when I was wanting to create a math interactive notebook for addition facts. I wanted to add pumpkins and other fun components, but it was intended for kindergarten and the pumpkin had things like a stem and other things going on. Therefore, I knew I needed to simplify the cutting some more. Thus, my original shape flap, the globe, solved that problem. I then expanded upon that concept to include some more fun shape flaps that were a little more complex in shape, but not too complicated for cutting.

 

The twelfth template type is the Spinner. These add a whimsical element to an interactive notebook by storing information under the top part of the spinner. Students can spin and peak into the window. This particular template involves the need for an extra part: a fastener or aka brad. It might not be a template for everyday use, but it is fun to include one here and there for students.

The thirteenth template type is the Stage. I actually came up with this concept for this template type when I was writing my Interactive Reading Notebook for Non-Fiction. I was brain storming ideas for a retelling key ideas in a text, and I thought, why not a stage where students could use “puppets” that work as prompts for them retelling those key ideas. Thus, the stage template was born.

The fourteenth template type is the Staggered Book. The staggered book is very much like a mini-book, but each page is a different size. The biggest page goes on the bottom, and it builds up to the smallest page. This allows room for some information to peek out from each page.

The fifteenth page is the Tri-Fold. There are actually two types of tri-folds. There is the basic tri-fold that has three distant sections that can also be broken down into many tabs. There is also the interlock that has an extra part that locks the tri-fold. These template types come in handy for a lot of educational activities.

I don’t really count the Venn Diagram as a template type, but I did not want to leave it out.

Venn Diagrams can easily be added to flip flap books and tri-folds, but I also did that work for you in my Interactive Notebook Templates 1000+. This resource includes all fifteen of the template types mentioned above. With many of the template types, I got creative with the designs and included an assortment of options. In fact, I included over 1,000 templates! I created these in Adobe Illustrator and exported them as png images. They are crisp and clean to keep those interactive notebooks looking sharp. I also inserted these into editable PowerPoints. Add your text boxes and images and you are ready to go! For those who are asking what a text box is, I got you covered because I even included visual directions on how to insert text boxes, images, and some other handy PowerPoint tips to make it easy for you to add educational content to the templates. Additionally, these templates come with photographed directions that cover all the template types! There is also a reference guide with an organized name and file system in place to help you locate those templates easily. You can find the templates located here or click on the image.

 

Thanks for stopping by The Candy Class! Don’t be a stranger!
Jolene 🙂

 

12 04, 2015

Oa, Oe, Ow, Oa, Oe The Vowel Teams

By | April 12th, 2015|hands-on, Interactive Notebooks, phonics, Reading|0 Comments

(Sing the title to the tune of a famous boy band song from quite a few decades ago. I won’t say which one, but it you get if right, you got the right stuff, lol!)

Vowel Teams Oa Oe 2

You know how we all see these cute cvc activities all over the place, but then students get to other phonics activities and suddenly…bam, the availability of hands-on centers are too often replaced with worksheets galore.

Vowel Teams Oa Oe 1

One of my wise college professors use to say, “If you can turn it into a game, do it!” Then she would go on to explain how they will learn more because if it is interesting to them, it is engaging to them. If they are engaged, they are learning!

  Relevancy is just important! What we view as relevant and what a young child views as relevant is two different things. Most often, they are not thinking about that math they will need when they are 25 to balance the checkbook. Nor are they thinking about how they need to become fluent writers to become a celebrity spy one day, I mean journalist. No way! Of course, they need plenty of writing opportunities. My point is they are not usually thinking they need to improve all their skills, so they can “adult.” To really engage them in learning, its important we get into their world to make it relevant. So what do children find relevant? Things like games, yup, that is relevant.
Vowel Teams Oa Oe 4
Vowel Teams Oa Oe 3
Enjoying putting puzzles together with their friends. Relevant.
Vowel Teams Oa Oe 5
Participating in class discussions with interactive anchor charts. Relevant.

 

Hands-on word work activities that tie into what they are learning to read. Relevant.

 

 Doing fun things like feeding sharks and gators as a word work activity in an interactive notebook. Yup, you guessed it. Relevant.
Adding some laughs to learning with some fun puns doesn’t hurt the learning process either. 😉  After all, research shows the connection of our memories with emotional experiences. (I have no research paper to point to on that one. It is researched based though. I recall reading up on it many times in my college days. You’ve probably heard that before too).
 Now, I know, I know, I know. No prep printables have their place. Sometimes, you need something for a quick review, homework, for a filler, etc. I get it. I am not saying those don’t have their place, but I am just trying to say its important kids get plenty of kinesthetic, relevent opportunities to master important phonics skills like vowel teams. The main point I am trying to make is worksheets should be kept in moderation, and children need more than just worksheets.
Vocabulary cards are also very handy. They can be used for self-checking and more. Some other ideas include putting them in alphabetical order, games like go fish and memory, matching rhyming words, and whatever else you can dream up. Cards like this are just handy and versatile. 🙂
Now this unit is HUGE. It is over 500 pages! Here is some organization inspiration. Baggies are my best friend, for real. I write on each bag what is inside to keep my sanity. 🙂 I like to keep it all in one spot (in the large coral container, minus the dice. When I plan on using these, I place them in a smaller bin like the shoe box container, and the reading center is ready to rock and roll.
If we want students to become fluent readers and writers, giving them relevant hands-on word work experiences, then we got to keep it relevant to young learners. That is what my vowel team bundled unit is all about. Making it relevant. Engaging. And ultimately, giving students a firm foundation in phonics to enable them to be fluent readers and writers. 
 
Vowel Team Pin
 You can find these in the store as a big bundle ( 20% off) or you can buy them individually.

Don’t miss out! Sign-up for email on the right.  I post helpful tips, freebies, giveaways, and more!

 Thanks for stopping by The Candy Class.
Jolene 🙂
3 12, 2014

Interview with an Accordion

By | December 3rd, 2014|Interactive Notebooks, Interview with a Notebook Template|1 Comment

 
 Today, I am “interviewing” the accordion template.
 
1. What is an accordion template? An accordion template is a unique type of interactive notebook template. It consists of a paper that is folded just like an accordion. Now sometimes that paper can be shaped like a rectangle or it can even be shaped like a bunch of bears. The folds in the accordion leave separate spaces for adding educational content. These are great for students because they become a very unique graphic organizer that literally pops off the page. 
 
2. How can they be used? Since the accordion functions like a graphic organizer, think about using these for lessons that need to be filled with connecting information such as processes, chronological order, order of events, and steps.  

Here are Some Ideas:  
They are good for phonics activities.
 
Patters- Accordions are great for teaching color and number patterns. 
 
Number Patterns- Students can add missing numbers and/or do some skip counting.


Science- Learning the names of planets, parts of the body, or steps to the scientific process are all ideas that fit great with accordions. 
 
Spelling Lists- Why not have students write their spelling list on an accordion to keep handy in their notebook for reference?


More Ideas: 
•Order of events such as story sequencing or historical time lines.
•The steps to the writing process can be recorded on an accordion.
•Math Facts- You can write math facts on these, and students can put them out to practice memorizing their addition or multiplication facts. 
 
3. How else are these handy? Accordions are also handy because you can get a lot of information on them without taking up a gigantic amount of notebook real estate. If you look at this entry, you realize you can not only squeeze counting by 2s on the page, but you can include other types of skip counting on the same page! The same can go for adding spelling list. You can fit multiple spelling lists all on the same page. These accordions have lots of potential to maximize space in a notebook.  
 
4. These seem complicated to make. How can I make these and get everything else done? True, creating accordions take some design skill because essentially they need to flow. Now you could just place a bunch of squares together in PowerPoint. However, if you are telling students to cut on the solid lines. That is going to get confusing when you have solid lines running in the middle for folding. Good news, I create interactive notebook templates that are quality made in Adobe Illustrator at 300 ppi. The outer solid lines are for cutting, and the inner dotted lines are for folding. Less confusion, more productivity in the classroom. And these templates save you a TON of time because they are already made for you. All you need to do is add text boxes and images, and you are set to go. I even include a tutorial on how to do that!
This set includes all my accordion templates in one set. They come in png images and editable PowerPoints, include visual directions for the different types of templates, and a reference guide with a name system to help you find just the right template easily. Click on the image to link.
 
Many, but not all, of the accordions from the set above can also be found in my Interactive Notebook Templates 1000+ set. This set includes over 1,000 templates from many different template types. Click on the image to link.
 
Also, these template sets can be used for commercial use on sites like Teachers Pay Teachers as long as you follow my terms of use. 
You can email me questions about interactive notebook templates at teachcandyclass@gmail.com. Make sure to stop back by. I will be offering tips on a bunch more template types in the future.
 
Thanks for visiting!
Jolene 🙂
 
 
 


8 12, 2013

Ho, Ho, Ho, Merry Christmas: Enjoy Some Freebies!

By | December 8th, 2013|Christmas, Freebies, Interactive Notebooks, Math|0 Comments

I want to say thank you for all the attention my little store has been receiving since late October. It truly has been an answered prayer for me because it seemed the doors were shut for over a month before that and everything there was completely silent. It is hard to believe I have gone from around 20 followers at Teachers Pay Teachers to 90 followers in such a short time! As promised, the Free Interactive Math Notebook Entry for Addition Facts 6-10 has been posted! I originally hoped to get this out a week earlier, but my Christmas Tree Life Cycle unit took me 2 weeks longer to create than originally anticipated, Thanksgiving and Black Friday happened, I had previously committed to Facebook Frenzy and needed to create clip art to go with it, and I had to rush out-of-town this weekend for a family emergency. I am still out of town, but brought my computer with me and a determination to complete this freebie for everyone! And now it is here with time to use it before Christmas break. Enjoy!

Click on Image to Link
Also, you may want to join the Facebook Frenzy. It is a collaboration of clip artists with freebies! The snowman will lead the way. Hurry! It ends December 9th.
Click on Image to Link
Oh, and I am celebrating gaining over 400 followers on my Facebook page by throwing 20% off until December 9th. I am also planning a product giveaway soon to celebrate…I just need to get home and figure out Rafflecopter! Here is another look at that Life Cycle of a Christmas Tree unit that is on sale!
Click on Images to Link
I wrote the original fiction book because I could not find a book dedicated completely to the topic in the big city I live in with well stocked libraries. It is the gem to this unit! 

 

Merry Christmas everyone!
Jolene

 

 

 

21 10, 2013

Say What?

By | October 21st, 2013|Interactive Notebooks, Reading|0 Comments

 

 

 

 

Saturday night, I felt like I was up all night giving birth! Kid you not! And well, I kind of gave birth to an Interactive Reading Notebook for Non-Fiction with cuteness added. Ok, well, not the same…I know, lol, and eating that coconut cream popsicle to keep my eyes opened would make any woman in labor Saturday night probably want to beat me over the head for such a comparison. While I have been laboring with this for the past few weeks with just about every spare moment, I was determined to get this baby out and delivered by Sunday morning, and I thought it would not take that long to finish. Well, one extra hour turned into two as I persisted to finish it, and two into four because I am a perfectionist….until it was 8:30 am and the little interactive reading notebook was finally smiling back at me on the screen…. literally that little penguin was smiling as she held her composition reading journal in her little penguin hands.
 
 
Every page is truly interactive! Each page has a moving part. Your child or class can revisit them like an archive throughout the year for review. These journals make learning relevant, kinesthetic (hands-on), visual, and fun, fun, fun! 
 
 Don’t overlook the fact that it includes 27 blank templates for personal use! And did you see it has some science activities with it! I tried to make the preview above big if you click on it…didn’t work out, but you can download a pdf preview for free that allows you to get a close up look of the items in it in my TPT store. Just click on the image to lead the way.
Includes photographed PowerPoint instructions. That way you can project them in your classroom. A grayscale pdf and color pdf is also included. Oh, and this baby was 156 pages long!
My little bear is loving his interactive reading journal and has a new kind of excitement for reading these days! Makes it well worth the hard work I put into this baby over the last few weeks! (Oh, and so sorry woman who gave birth this past Saturday and congrats!)
Be blessed!
Jolene
 

3 10, 2013

Would You Like an Interactive Notebook Freebie?

By | October 3rd, 2013|Interactive Notebooks, Math|0 Comments

 

 

 

 

You heard that right! An interactive notebook freebie!  They are so useful for so many reasons. First, they are interactive. That means children can interact with the notebook like an interactive conversation between a teacher and student. With all the pieces that flip, they can revisit the journal later after the lesson for a little selfie quiz.  Not only that, but interactive journals are an outlet for publishing, and that my friend gives their work purpose. Not to mention, they are visual and kinesthetic (hands-on), which helps meet the various learning needs of young learners.  Since I am new to blogging, I just want to let everyone know that I have a lot of special things planned for this blog. I plan to offer exclusive freebies that will not be posted in my store at TPT, flash freebies, teaching ideas, some tutorials on creating bath and beauty products, some inspiration, and more! If you would like to receive an email when I post something new, simply click on the right where it says “follow by email”.  So don’t forget to download your interactive notebook freebie, and you might want to follow me on TPT while you are there, so you can get updates when I post stuff on there.  Simply click on the image below to receive your freebie! (Well, I hope it is “simply” able to link to it properly, lol!) If not, click the link below the image.
Enjoy and be blessed,
Jolene